PARC Resource Directory

Our twenty-four page resource guide is used by over 50,000 prisoners a year all across the United States. Learn More

Pelican Bay Hunger Strike

On July 1st, 2011 prisoners at Pelican Bay went on hunger strike to protest the cruel, inhumane and tortuous conditions of their imprisonment. Learn More About Their Struggle

Prisoner Describes His Torture

These drawings were sent to us from a prisoner who is repeatedly tortured by the guards. Learn more

2019 PARC Directory

PARC corresponds with and mails a directory of resources to prisoners, their friends and family members. 
 

Download a PDF copy of the Resource Directory today!

Recent Alerts

Kelly Ann Savage is Free!

We are absolutely thrilled to share that Kelly Savage was released from prison last week!!!

The Genesis of Increasing Incidents of Police Brutality: The War on Drugs

What is the cause of the spiraling increase in police assaults on people whom they should help to protect --- not brutalize or kill? In just the month of March, 2015, American police killed 111 people -- more people than the police in the United Kingdom have killed since the year 1900.[1]

After 4 decades in solitary, Albert Woodfox's release ordered by federal judge

A federal judge in Baton Rouge has called for the unconditional release of Albert Woodfox, the only remaining imprisoned member of the Angola 3.

Woodfox, 68, was placed solitary confinement at Louisiana State Penitentiary at Angola and other state facilities for more than 40 years for reasons related to the 1972 murder of prison guard Brent Miller. 

Facebook Now a Place for Prisoners, Too

Civil rights advocates lobbied Facebook to stop automatically deleting all profiles of current American prisoners, The Daily Beast has learned. But the debate on whether someone is too dangerous ever to have one is still raging.

One day at work, Larissa admitted to logging onto Facebook “to see my kids’ Easter pictures.”

She had been put on work furlough because the Alabama Department of Corrections deemed her a low security risk. She was allowed to leave prison to work shifts at a local Burger King.

How Congress Killed One of the Few Lifelines for Former Prisoners -- And Why It's Time to Bring It Back

Congress members are pushing to restore Pell Grants to help prisoners pay for their college education.
 
By Zaid Jilani / AlterNet / June 3, 2015

In 1965, Congress passed Title IV of the Higher Education Act, allowing prison inmates for the first time to apply for Pell Grants to finance their college educations. For decades, tens of thousands of prisoners took advantage of this benefit, using it to finance a path into opportunities after they served their sentences.

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About PARC

PARC is a prison abolitionist group based on Oakland, California committed to exposing and challenging the institutionalized racism, sexism, ableism, heterosexism, and classism of the Prison Industrial Complex. Learn More or Donate to PARC:


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